Mary Morony, Author of Apron Strings, Done Growed Up and If It Ain't One Thing

Reader Reviews

Great read! This book has so much heart. Sallee’s adventures and witty commentary keep you entertained and the pages turning but it’s the honest portrayal of human sentiment that makes this book so great. I laughed, I cried, I went through the gamut of emotions from cover to cover and thoroughly enjoyed every minute of it. I would highly recommend to any and everyone!

Southern Storytelling at its best!

In this second installment of a historical fiction trilogy, a couple’s divorce results in repercussions for all the members of the Mackey family in 1963 Virginia.

Twelve-year-old Sallee Mackey is coping well since her parents Joe and Ginny split up, in part because she’s fond of her dad’s new friend, Linda. But little sister Helen’s too nervous to even discuss their father’s place while a…

KIRKUS Review

A white Virginian family in the late 1950s struggles to stay together while enduring a failing marriage and racist neighbors in Morony’s debut historical drama. For the Mackey family, 1957 changed everything, at least according to 7-year-old Sallee. Morony writes in a candid voice, refusing to sugarcoat the overt racism and making it clear that a small family in Virginia won’t change the bullheade…

Kirkus Reviews

Magical descriptive writing underpins this entire novel. Rich and discerning they create such a powerful visual image that it is hard not to empathise with the characters or find one’s self swept away to a different era. Best described as a snapshot of extraordinary lives, what makes this very special is the ability of the author Mary Morony to get beneath the veneer of everyday life and explore…

Magical

I know that you were portraying the very real love between a black housekeeper and her white family. But you were also portraying the everyday tragedy of human beings coping with their personal limitations and the prejudices (not just racial) of the people around them. We are prisoners of ourselves. But there is hope. And Ethel provides us hope in the end by being inspired and taking responsibilit…

Gayle Engbrecht

Thoughtful and deeply moving, Apron Strings is the debut novel from author Mary Morony. A tale told through the eyes of Sallee and the answers she solicits from Ethel, Morony delivers a masterful narrative that is both beguiling and flawlessly executed. With a meticulous ear for dialogue Morony’s diction is simply exquisite, effortlessly capturing the cultural identities of her leading character…

Book Viral Review

Realistic Yet Uplifting Story

Mary Morony has done a wonderful job of describing central Virginia life in the 1950s and 1960s. Her characters are vivid and realistic. She describes them as individuals rather than as members of any certain group of people. She sympathetically shows them with their tender hearts as well as their human foibles. She describes honest interaction between blacks and whi…

Arlie Alexander

The Perfect Read!

Mary Morony’s superbly written, Apron Strings, brought back lost memories of Virginia’s late 50’s/early 60’s…Especially rich is the storyline between seven year old Sallee and Ethel, the family’s maid…So well written, I could actually “hear” their dialogue and I thanked the heavens for the safe haven Ethel tried to provide Sallee from the all too many dysfunctional adults…I smil…

Mackie

Virginia author Mary Marony is a Southern humanist who stepped onto the literary stage with an exceptionally elegant and deeply meaningful debut novel, APRON STRINGS. She lived in the South during the times about which she writes, waited until later in life to embrace her higher education by earning an degree in English form the University of Virginia, and then turned her personal history into an …

Grady Harp, Vine Voice

Terrific read! I’m so attached to the characters.

Morony paints such a vivid picture of the Mackey family, you could almost smell Ginny’s perfume, taste the gin in Ethel’s tin cup or play Barbie with Sallee and Helen. Apron Strings was sweet and compelling, but also disturbing and tragic. I’m dying to read more about Sallee and Ethel. Hurry up and write Mary Morony!

Denise Hood
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