Mary Morony, Author of Apron Strings, Done Growed Up and If It Ain't One Thing

Reader Reviews

Wonderfully put together all the drama so relatable either got me rejoicing or dubiously confused or emotionally draining. Each character built themselves up and to follow them, ‘exciting.’ Crazy but true I could feel Sallee’s troubles and her emotional dilemmas; however Ethel, her character played an important part here for this family. Don’t you think in your life that one person who wil…

It Will Consume You

If you liked To Kill a Mockingbird and The Help, you’ll love Apron Strings. It’s the quintessential story of life in the south, where racism and Southern charm coexist. It’s narrated by 7-year-old Sallee, who looks to Ethel, the family’s black maid as her surrogate mother. Mary Morony’s rich characters, twisting plot and beautiful writing show that love has no color.

Sissy Spacek

Complex and multi-layered, “Apron Strings” is a deftly written and compelling read from beginning to end. Author Mary Morony is able to showcase fully developed characters and a superbly crafted story that will linger in the mind long after the novel is finished and set back upon the shelf. “Apron Strings” is highly recommended for personal reading lists and community library general fiction colle…

Wonderful, Captivating, applauds to Mary Moroney!!

Wonderful prose clearly depicting the place and times. The character development was done so well, you wanted to reach out and hug the children, as well as shake some sense into the mother!!

Ann Marie Harmon

In this second installment of a historical fiction trilogy, a couple’s divorce results in repercussions for all the members of the Mackey family in 1963 Virginia.

Twelve-year-old Sallee Mackey is coping well since her parents Joe and Ginny split up, in part because she’s fond of her dad’s new friend, Linda. But little sister Helen’s too nervous to even discuss their father’s place while a…

KIRKUS Review

Mary Morony is an author of epic proportions. She feels like a secret I want to expose to the world. I recently had the pleasure of interviewing her on my Radio Show, FrankieSense & More, and as someone who interviews a LOT of authors weekly, I must say, Mary really stood out. She writes dialogue that is sumptuous and soothing. The kind of book you can’t put down and wished didn’t end.

Frankie Pic…

Author of Epic Proportions

Thoughtful and deeply moving, Apron Strings is the debut novel from author Mary Morony. A tale told through the eyes of Sallee and the answers she solicits from Ethel, Morony delivers a masterful narrative that is both beguiling and flawlessly executed. With a meticulous ear for dialogue Morony’s diction is simply exquisite, effortlessly capturing the cultural identities of her leading character…

Book Viral Review

Wonderfully put together all the drama so relatable either got me rejoicing or dubiously confused or emotionally draining. Each character built themselves up and to follow them, ‘exciting.’ Crazy but true I could feel Sallee’s troubles and her emotional dilemmas; however Ethel, her character played an important part here for this family. Don’t you think in your life that one person who wi…
Darlene Cruz

Wonderfully Realized

Author Mary Morony does a terrific job of depicting life in the 1950’s south in this compelling novel of growing up in the segregated society of central Virginia. I literally couldn’t put it down as I was swept into her descriptions of the conflicts and confusion that racism and apartheid inflicted on those (both black and white) who grew up in that era. Highly recommended.

Hedge

Whether you are staying out of the heat or diving into the water I have a great must read recommendation for you this summer.  Apron Strings by local author Mary Morony hits every note perfectly.  A coming of age story which is set in our own backyard, this novel will propel you down memory lane if you grew up in this area. Even if you are not from Charlottesville, the Southern flavor is sure to…

Book Worm Book Reviews
); ga('require', 'linkid', 'linkid.js'); ga('send', 'pageview');