Mary Morony, Author of Apron Strings and Done Growed Up

Introducing Second Mary Morony Southern Fiction NovelistNovel in the Apron Strings Trilogy from Mary Morony, Southern Fiction Novelist – Done Growed Up 

The first 2 books in the Apron Strings Trilogy from Mary Morony, Southern Fiction Novelist, are available for purchase CLICK HERE  (want a sneak peek at Done Growed Up?  Get it HERE.)

 

 

Southern Fiction At It’s Finest in a heartwarming, and sometimes heart wrenching, novel from local author, Mary Morony. Done Growed Up, the second book in Morony’s Apron Strings Trilogy, will be available for purchase NOW. Author Mary Morony, is excited to share her second novel with the world!

 

When we last left the Mackey Family in the late 1950s, their lives were in turmoil. Divorce, alcoholism, racism, death, puberty – what WEREN’T they dealing with? Ethel, a black maid in a racist world – the true heart and soul of the Mackey Family, is the children’s only constant as she fights her own numerous demons. Twelve-year-old Sallee struggles to understand the world with little enlightenment from the adults around her. Ginny, newly divorced mother of four, finds that she doesn’t have the luxury of being the spoiled princess she once was. She is overwhelmed with responsibility, feelings of abandonment, and alcoholism. Joe, Ginny’s ex, and the children’s father, revels in new-found wealth and popularity with women, but agonizes over his children and the dangers within their broken family.  These characters and more will draw you into heartwarming moments and terrible tragedies and, maybe, teach you a few things in the process!

 

Author Mary Morony was born and raised in Charlottesville, Virginia, mainly by her family’s beloved black maid.  Her childhood was a time of segregated schools and many places that prohibited black people. Morony’s inspiration for the Apron Strings Trilogy was her strong relationship with her maid and caretaker, who taught her more about life and love than anyone has since. Morony also uses personal life tragedies and triumphs to produce novels with real experiences and true emotion.

 

“I feel like the trauma in my life has been a gift,” Morony says. “I felt compelled to pass on what I have learned to overcome those traumatic experiences. The Mackey Family was replete with candidates for counseling in Apron Strings. In Done Growed Up, the characters find methods to deal with their addictions, obsessions and anger.”

 

Morony’s first novel, Apron Strings, was released in 2014 and is touted as a “truly compelling novel” reminiscent of To Kill A Mockingbird and The Help. This novel’s story begins in the year when the state of Virginia attempted to desegregate the public school system. Morony’s story rings true with history and recounts the confusion and bigotry as seen from both sides of the issue. Her characters are compelling and relatable, with personal triumphs and tragedies of their own. Morony lets readers see into the characters’ very souls in order to create true kinships with her readers.
“In Apron Strings, I left some of my characters on the edge at the end. Resolutions to life issues are not always tied up in a neat little bow,” Morony explains. “I wanted my readers to know that they shouldn’t just wait around for someone to ‘happily ever after’ their own life.”

 

GET A SNEAK PEEK OF DONE GROWED UP HERE

Purchase Done Growed Up NOW on >>  AMAZON.COM!

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Apron Strings The NovelMary Morony’s first Novel, Apron Strings

 

Complex and multi-layered, “Apron Strings,” the first novel in the series, is a deftly written and compelling read from beginning to end and is both up-lifting and tragic. Mary Morony creates word portraits of her characters and crafts her stories masterfully.

 

Apron Strings is a powerful, touching and funny novel in the vein of To Kill A Mockingbird, Fried Green Tomatoes and The Help. A story of love and bigotry, family and the people who love us, author Mary Morony shares a story based on her own Southern childhood and the lives of the people around her.

 

Apron Strings, set in the Charlottesville in the 1950’s during a turbulent time where racism and love collide and huge gaps exist in the lives of everyone involved. More than just a story about racism, this is also a story about substance abuse and the abuse of people and power to try to fill the holes left in lives by hate and anger.

 

Author Mary Morony delivers a tour de force of honest characters, lively humor, and painful tragedy. She writes her novels in a candid voice, refusing to sugarcoat the overt racism and making it clear that a small family in Virginia won’t change the bullheaded beliefs of others.  She brings Southern charm, irreverence, and wit to bear on subjects as vast as racism and as personal as alcoholism

ORDER APRON STRINGS NOW

READER REVIEWS


Realistic Yet Uplifting Story

Mary Morony has done a wonderful job of describing central Virginia life in the 1950s and 1960s. Her characters are vivid and realistic. She describes them as individuals rather than as members of any certain group of people. She sympathetically shows them with their tender hearts as well as their human foibles. She describes honest interaction between blacks and whi…

Arlie Alexander


Terrific read! I’m so attached to the characters.

Morony paints such a vivid picture of the Mackey family, you could almost smell Ginny’s perfume, taste the gin in Ethel’s tin cup or play Barbie with Sallee and Helen. Apron Strings was sweet and compelling, but also disturbing and tragic. I’m dying to read more about Sallee and Ethel. Hurry up and write Mary Morony!

Denise Hood

If you liked To Kill a Mockingbird and The Help, you’ll love Apron Strings. It’s the quintessential story of life in the south, where racism and Southern charm coexist. It’s narrated by 7-year-old Sallee, who looks to Ethel, the family’s black maid as her surrogate mother. Mary Morony’s rich characters, twisting plot and beautiful writing show that love has no color.

Sissy Spacek

… What I like best about the story, however, is the sense of place and time that ever so subtly seems to be catalyst, if not cause, of the decline of Joe, Ginny, and their marriage. And of course, you know that I remember how palpable race was every day in every way in the pre-Lyndon Johnson South of my childhood and adolescence. It really is wonderful how different your portrayal of black-white r…

James W. CunninghamUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

     . . .First, your time lapses were very good—well-placed, enabling the reader to fill in what might have been difficult personality development.  You didn’t merely tell, you showed.  I particularly found it helpful to know the child rearing, or lack thereof, styles of the domestic help versus the parents of Ginny.  It was logical that Ginny turned out the way she did with no brake fr…

Chris Shepherd

‘Change; not even the quarter, nickel, or dime type was appreciated in our house.’ Virginia author Mary Morony is a Southern humanist who steps onto the literary stage with an exceptionally elegant and deeply meaningful debut novel, APRON STRINGS. She lived in the South during the times about which she writes, waited until later in life to embrace her higher education by earning an degree in Engli…

Grady Harp, July 14 Amazon

Whether you are staying out of the heat or diving into the water I have a great must read recommendation for you this summer.  Apron Strings by local author Mary Morony hits every note perfectly.  A coming of age story which is set in our own backyard, this novel will propel you down memory lane if you grew up in this area. Even if you are not from Charlottesville, the Southern flavor is sure to…

Book Worm Book Reviews

I know that you were portraying the very real love between a black housekeeper and her white family. But you were also portraying the everyday tragedy of human beings coping with their personal limitations and the prejudices (not just racial) of the people around them. We are prisoners of ourselves. But there is hope. And Ethel provides us hope in the end by being inspired and taking responsibilit…

Gayle Engbrecht


Wonderfully Realized

Author Mary Morony does a terrific job of depicting life in the 1950’s south in this compelling novel of growing up in the segregated society of central Virginia. I literally couldn’t put it down as I was swept into her descriptions of the conflicts and confusion that racism and apartheid inflicted on those (both black and white) who grew up in that era. Highly recommended.

Hedge


The Perfect Read!

Mary Morony’s superbly written, Apron Strings, brought back lost memories of Virginia’s late 50’s/early 60’s…Especially rich is the storyline between seven year old Sallee and Ethel, the family’s maid…So well written, I could actually “hear” their dialogue and I thanked the heavens for the safe haven Ethel tried to provide Sallee from the all too many dysfunctional adults…I smil…

Mackie